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Thursday, 17 March 2016

SOME STRANGE ADVICE FROM DR. SUSAN DUNCAN, CONSULTANT NEUROLOGIST



                                                                           



                             I have dyspraxia and no one ever knows what it is, by Imogen Goulden



 I have an ongoing complaint to NHS, which they seem to be trying to trash. Dr. Duncan appears to only recognise seizures with explicitly physical external symptoms, Hence her crass denial that 'petit mal seizures' (absences) even exist, and her subsequent description of my absences as mere 'distractions'


 I was re-diagnosed last year by a highly eminent NHS consultant, who treated me privately, as suffering from Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), but with many of the neuro-physical symptoms of dyspraxia. A few days ago, Thomas and I attended my NHS appointment with Dr, Susan Duncan to discuss my frequently occurring and quite debilitating apparent petit mal seizures. To my surprise she needed to ask me what ADD was, and that was just for starters! 

HERE IS THE DISCUSSION SURROUNDING A SUBSEQUENT POST TO MENTAL HEALTH DISCUSSIONS EDINBURGH, THE FIRST PARAGRAPH WAS COMPOSED BY MYSELF AS ADMINISTRATOR. THE LADY IN THE PICTURE (IMOGEN GOULDEN) RECEIVED HER LACK OF TREATMENT FOR DYSPRAXIA ELSEWHERE:

Some extremely ignorant NHS consultants e,g. one at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh, doubt that it (dyspraxia) even exists, 'He may just be clumsy' said the highly eminent neurologist Dr. Susan Duncan earlier this week, She doesn't believe that (my) petit mal seizures exist either, and she regards the 'spectrum' as a theoretical construct, Where are these people coming from? By repeatedly implying that 'there's nothing wrong with you' they put their patients' health benefits at grievous risk.



It's more than just 'not being able to catch'
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Clayton James Johnson Evidently, neuroscientists as early as the 1930's would hold text up to the mirror, and then students would be able to read it. Certainly, there were a disproportionate number of students diagnosed dyslexic in the 1980's, as with ADD in the 1990's. For any medical specialist to deny the existence of dyslexia, though, represents a clear case of cognitive dissonance with medical research and findings.
UnlikeReply14 hrs
Thomas Leonard She was partly convinced about dyslexia, but not so about dyspraxia
LikeReply12 hrs
Denver Nobles What do they say about Paroxysmal Spells?
UnlikeReply21 hr
Thomas Leonard http://www.consultant360.com/.../paroxysmal-events... I don't know what they say, but I believe that petit mal seizures of a non-epileptic nature can occur because of possibly undetectable neurological problems
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Thomas Leonard Absences (sometimes called petit mal)

Absence seizures are more common in children than adults and can happen very frequently. During an absence a person becomes unconscious for a short time. They may look blank and stare, or their eyelids might flutter. They will not respond to what is happening around them. If they are walking they may carry on walking but will not be aware of what they are doing.

Absences can be confused with daydreaming. However, unlike daydreaming, someone who is having an absence will not usually respond. Also, if blank spells happen when someone is doing something that they enjoy, such as talking or playing a game, then this is less likely to be daydreaming.

In typical absences, the person becomes blank and unresponsive for a few seconds. Because the seizures are brief, they may not be noticed.

Atypical absences often last a bit longer than typical absences. They often have some physical movement with them such as a brief head nod.

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                                                   ABOUT DR.SUSAN DUNCAN





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Noreen Leigh · Friends with Russell Stronach
Is she referring to non epileptic petit mal seizures or in general petit mal seizures. Im pretty sure I havent imagined mine for the last 44 years!
UnlikeReply19 hrs
Thomas Leonard
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Thomas Leonard I think that she's only prepared to diagnose epileptic seizures full stop, She doesn't believe in petit mal seizures at all!
LikeReplyJust now





Following my complaint to NHS Lothian:


Duncan, Susan E Susan.E.Duncan@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk

1:59 PM (21 hours ago)
to meFeedback

I’m afraid my Dictaphone has just given up on me and I am told we have to contact Philips for a  release code so can’t write any letters




homas Leonard leonardthomas70@googlemail.com

3:00 PM (20 hours ago)
to SusanFeedback
Please forward my complaint as appropriate, and stop taking the (Michael), I would like to make this complaint formall


Duncan, Susan E Susan.E.Duncan@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk

3:35 PM (19 hours ago)
to Feedbackme

Dear Mr Leanard
My Dictaphone has now  had it’s oft ware problem repaired and I am now in position to address your concerns

With kind regards
Susan Duncan



Thomas Leonard leonardthomas70@googlemail.com

11:17 PM (12 hours ago)
to SusanFeedback
Dear Dr, Duncan,

             I quite frankly don't wish to hear anything you have to say at all, because I wouldn't give it an an ounce of credibility, My language to you in my last e.mail was entirely  appropriate since it reflected the way you took the Michael both in your last e-mail and in your discussions with me and Thomas. He is also upset, since he is also on the spectrum, as is my flatmate Scott who suffers from dyspraxia. My own re-diagnosis was completed last year by Dr, Premal Shah, one of the leading NHS consultants on ADD in Scotland, I don't believe that you even referred to it. You may well be a leading international expert on epilepsy, but this has nothing to do with my condition, I do not believe that you are responsible enough to treat any patient on the spectrum  ever again. and I sincerely hope that you are now prevented from doing so

                                                     Yours sincerely,

                                                           Dr. Thomas Leonard

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